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Here is what we think is the only comprehensive record of pubs and beerhouses within the Coventry city boundaries going back as far as available records allow. This is an ongoing project so contributions, corrections or additions to this archive, especially anecdotes, photos and media are most welcome. Feel free to contact us for a pint and a chat anytime.

The Prince William Henry

Prince William  Henry  Coventry
NAME PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY
ADDRESS 252 FOLESHILL ROAD
ALTERNATIVE ADDRESSES OLD LEICESTER ROAD, COVENTRY & HINCKLEY TURNPIKE ROAD
THIS PREMISES HAS BEEN KNOWN BY DIFFERENT NAMES DURING ITS HISTORY FROM TO KNOWN AS
1790 PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY
1829 GREEN DRAGON
1835 PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY
1835 1841 BEERHOUSE, Foleshill Road
1841 2005 PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY

Prince William Henry (1743 - 1805) was a grandson of George II and younger brother of George III. He was born at Leicester House, London, fifth child of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Princess Augusta of Saxe - Gotha. The previous children were Augusta, George, Edward and Elizabeth. Frederick died in 1751 leaving his eldest son, Prince George, as heir apparent. He became King George III in 1760 and 1764 he created Prince William Henry Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh. He never seems to have done anything remarkable, so why name your pub after him?

There have benn various estimates that it dates from 1760 to 1794. it looks to me like a longhouse, that is an early farmhouse, so may be even earlier. it is said that it was originally called the GREEN DRAGON until Prince William Henry stayed here so that afterwards the name was changed to the Prince William Henry. In 1835 and 1841 it is listed as simply the BEERHOUSE, Foleshill Road.

In 1982 it was said to be 'very long with many interconnected rooms. recommended for a visit'. In 2005 there were plans to bulldoze the pub and build a three story apartment block. These plans were turned down by Coventry Council for the following reasons :

A. Loss of a locally listed building
B. Would result in the loss of an area of Urban Green Space
C. No evidence of need for the proposed development
D. Applicant failed to demonstrate an acceptable standard of living next to a source of considerable traffic noise.
E. No air quality assessment was submitted with the application

However, that didn't make the pub viable. By 2010 it had become the offices for Darlaston builders merchents. It still looks like a pub today, surrounded by stone and gravel.

Coventry Standard newspaper article from November 18th 1960

Known Licensees at the BEERHOUSE are;
1835 William Dalton
1841 Elijah Dalton

Known Licensees at the PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY are;
to 1958 Derek Maynard (see also Tollgate, Holyhead Road)
1958 onwards Robert Rawlinson (see above)

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