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Here is what we think is the only comprehensive record of pubs and beerhouses within the Coventry city boundaries going back as far as available records allow. This is an ongoing project so contributions, corrections or additions to this archive, especially anecdotes, photos and media are most welcome. Feel free to contact us for a pint and a chat anytime.

The Duke William

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NAME DUKE WILLIAM
ADDRESS SPON STREET
THIS PREMISES WAS KNOWN BY DIFFERENT NAMES DURING ITS HISTORY FROM TO KNOWN AS
1756 DUKE WILLIAM
1823 - 1833 JOINERS ARMS
c1834 1967 WILLIAM IV, KING WILLIAM IV
I don't know who this would refer to, but most likely William Duke of Normandy, later known as William the Conquerer. In the 1050's and early 1060's, William became a contender for the throne of England, then held by his childless relative, Edward the Confessor.

But there were other potential claimants, including the powerful English earl Harold Godwinson, who was named the next king by Edward on the latter's deathbed in January 1066. But William argued that Edward had earlier promised the throne to him, The Duchy of Normandy having supported King Edward's family and that Harold had sworn to support William's claim.

After building a large fleet, William invaded England in September 1066 and decisively defeated and killed Harold at the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066. After some further military efforts, William was crowned king on Christmas Day, 1066 at London. He then made arrangements for the governance of England in early 1067 before returning to Normandy. A number of rebellions followed, but William was able to put them down and by 1075 his hold on England was mostly secure. This allowed William to spend the majority of the rest of his reign on the continent.

The final years of William's reign were marked by difficulties in his continental domains, troubles with his eldest son, and threatened invasions of England by the Danes. In 1086 William ordered the compilation of Domesday Book, a survey listing all the landholders in England along with their holdings. William died in September 1087 while leading a campaign in northern France, and was buried in Caen. His reign in England was marked by the construction of castles, the settling of a new Norman nobility on the land, and change in the composition of the English clergy. He did not try to integrate his various domains into one empire, instead continuing to administer each part separately. After his death, William's lands were divided: Normandy went to his eldest son and his second surviving son received England.

In 1756, six soldiers were billeted here. This is thoght to be the pub that later became the JOINERS ARMS and then the WILLIAM IV

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