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Here is what we think is the only comprehensive record of pubs and beerhouses within the Coventry city boundaries going back as far as available records allow. This is an ongoing project so contributions, corrections or additions to this archive, especially anecdotes, photos and media are most welcome. Feel free to contact us for a pint and a chat anytime.

The Craven Arms Hotel

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NAME CRAVEN ARMS HOTEL
ADDRESS BRINKLOW ROAD, BINLEY
THIS PREMISES WAS KNOWN BY DIFFERENT NAMES DURING ITS HISTORY FROM TO KNOWN AS
1772 c2000 CRAVEN ARMS
c2000 BINLEY PARK INN
The name of this pub comes from the Earls of Craven who were local landowners, their seat being the nearby Coombe Abbey. It is said that the Earls of Craven used the kitchen of the original Craven Arms to collect rent from their tenants.

The first Craven Arms was built c1772 on the site of Binley Gallows. It is on the site of these gallows in 1495 that Sir Henry Mumford and Sir Robert Mallory were executed for treason. Since 1495 was the year of the Perkin Warbeck conspiracy to overthrow Henry VIII, it was assumed they were involved in this. Their heads were then set up on two of the city gates whilst their bodies were taken by the Franciscan friars and buried in their graveyard at Greyfriars Friary in Coventry. The heads were later buried with the bodies and these were dis-interred in 1931 whilst the Methodist Central Hall was being built.

Also at this site in Binley, a medieval cross stood called 'Maiden's Cross'. Then c1772 the Craven Arms was built. During the eighteenth century it was the meeting place of the 'Coombe and Binley Association for the Persecution of Felons' which offered rewards for the apprehension of criminals. In 1880 it advertised 'good accommodation for visitors and tourists to Coombe', so Coombe Abbey was already then a popular place of resort.

From 1915 the landlord was the famous Dan Claridge, the last man to drive a stagecoach from Coventry to London. He moved to this pub from the Craven Arms in the High Street. He could be seen with his white side-whiskers, dressed in a frock coat and top hat, welcoming the Atherstone Hunt which used to gather at the inn. He died in April 1923.

The new Craven Arms was built in c1930 and on 13th February 1975 became a Toby Steakhouse. It was renamed the BINLEY PARK INN c 2000.

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Known Licensees are;
1845 - 1850 James Akerman & Glazier
1863 - 1866 Henry Akerman
1868 Thomas Trevor
1874 Joseph Linnell
1876 - 1892 James Adams Linnell
1900 - 1915 Francis Walter Claridge
1915 - 1923 Walter Dan Claridge
1924 - 1926 Tom Hatton
1933 - 1938 W. Norbury
1939 - 1940 A. E. Swain
1945 - 1972 Edward Albert Estick
Binley Park Inn, Toby Carvery Binley. Ex Craven Arms.

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